Stereo Scanning Electron Microscopy

(Reveling high-resolution three-dimensional material structural complexity)

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“Twinned” test of a planktonic foraminfera (Globigenina sp.)

Pacific hexactinellid sponge skeleton (Aphrocallistes sp.)

Post-metamorphic Atlantic coral skeleton (Agaricia sp.)

Post-metamorphic Pacific coral skeleton (Acropora sp.)

Juvenile Pacific coral skeleton (Acropora sp.)

Pacific coral skeleton (Acropora sp.)

Pacific coral skeleton (Hydnophora sp.)

Pacific coral skeleton (Hydnophora sp.)

Pacific coral skeleton (Pocillopora sp.)

Pacific coral skeleton (Paracyathus sp.)

Soft coral sclerites (Sinularia sp.)

Consolidated sand grains from a Phragmatopoma sp. tube

Bryozoan skeleton (Watersipora sp.

Bryozoan skeleton (Diaperoecia sp.)

(Return to Image Gallery)  Gallery.html
One major drawback to a greatly enhanced depth of field in traditional scanning electron microscopy is the perceived loss of the apparent three dimensionality of an object.  As a result, the images can often appear flat and critical topographical features can be obscured. Stereo scanning electron microscopy can help resolve these issues by revealing previously undetectable three dimensional architectural complexities. To create this effect, two SEM images are acquired from different angles and the images are digitally combined to create an incredibly realistic composite. Tech.html

Abalone nacre (Haliotis sp.)